About

Lee Ingleton

Projects – these are larger projects that I have worked on, usually always involving some form of collaboration, usually some form of socially engaged practice

 

bla bla bla…….to fix….I am a transdisciplinary cultural worker, an artist, researcher, educator and curator. My practice is socially performative, exploring sound in an expanded and often dematerialised field through archives, conversations, interventions, hidden herstrories and historical amnesias. In all these areas my work is collaborative, seeking to balance the needs of the individual and the collective through anti-racist, queer feminist paradigms. Formally, I hold a PhD in Music (2015) with the research Composing Paradoxes: Feminist Process in Sound Arts and Experimental Musics through which I analyse socio-political differences and lived experiences of gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity and their manifestation in the making of sound arts and experimental musics; a Masters in Public Art (2007) during which I established the collaborative artist-run-initiative, Plateau_589 in a disused shopfront in Melbourne, Australia, exhibiting audiovisual interventions by local artists to passers by for over a year; and a BA in Sonic Arts (2005), an experience that transformed my love of music into a life-long practice of social composition. I have worked as a Digital Officer at the Women’s Resource Centre London (2016-17); researcher (ongoing) and lecturer (2010-2016) at University of the Arts London (UAL); web editor and Her Noise archivist at Electra (2010-2014). I co-curate at AMOQA, with Aphrodite* and Sound Acts in Greece. I am a collaborative co-founder of Sound:Gender:Feminism:Activism, a network and event series bringing together academics, artists, musicians and performers focused on gender in sound and music since 2012. I have performed at Tate Modern and London’s ICA and published internationally. Currently I reside in Athens, Greece where I co-direct AveloSpace, a makerspace for LGBTQIA arts and community; co-curate at Athens Museum of Queer Arts (AMOQA); and collaborate in the Gender Panic collective.